Love Tonya - blog
Mercoledì, 06 Luglio 2016

HAPPY BIRTHDAY BIKINI !

Bikini is 70 years old!!!!

It was 5th July 1946.  Louis Réard introduced his swimsuit to the media and public in Paris at Piscine Molitor a popular public pool. He was a French automobile engineer who had taken over his mother's lingerie business in about 1940. What inspired Réard?  A mosaic in Sicily dated no later than the mid fourth century? It's possible!!!!! Yes, amazing. The image I've chosen comes from the late-Roman villa at Piazza Armerina which is the most opulent single country building of that epoch so far known. ROOM 38: the celebrated "bikini" maidens mosaic, where the girls appear to be engaged in various kinds of athletic competition involving balls, dumbells, tambourines and miniature wheels. These ancient women sure have great beach bodies!

 

Love, 

T.

Venerdì, 01 Luglio 2016

FELLINI ABOUT FELLINI.

"You could call hallucination a deeper reality. In any event, I see no line between the imaginary and the actual".

"I used an iconography that has the allusiveness and intangibility of dreams".

"The cinema is very much like the circus: a mixture of technique, precision and improvisation. I love this way of creating and living at the same time".

"Definitions in art are meaningless. Tags belong on suitcases. In art all means are permissible. A filmaker? A mixture of magician and juggler, of propher and clown, of salesman and priest".

"Every creative process is like an operation to uncover one's personality. Any work of art can be considered a means to free oneself from an obsession. The liberation is in realizing the obsession and giving it form."

Love,

T.

W E I R D !!!

 

Three fake AMEDEO MODIGLIANI (Livorno,1884- Paris, 1920) head sculptures produced in 1984 by students from Livorno in what has been described as the greatest hoax in the history of Italian art!

 

It was the summer of 1984 and an exhibition to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Modigliani's birth in his hometown had begun on a lacklustre note. So in an effort to drum up more enthusiasm, the organizer, Vera Durbé, decided to fund a research for the carved heads that Modigliani is said to have hurled into the Fosse Reale canal after receiving negative rewiews. A week into the search, three sculptures were found at the bottom of the canal, prompting Durbé to announce they were Modigliani originals. But historian FEDERICO ZERI cast doubt on their authenticity, saying they were so "immature" that Modigliani had been right to cast them aside. The three students later confessed to producing one of them with a Black&Decker drill, while the other two were made by local artist Angelo Froglia. Froglia said he had merely intended to expose the judgement of art experts as overrated. The critics continued to insist on the works' authenticity for a while, but the evidence against them was overwhelming. Livorno and the rest of the world had witnessed one of the greatest hoaxes in Italian art history. 

 

Love,

T.

Lunedì, 27 Giugno 2016

SPOLETO FESTIVAL OF TWO WORLDS.

Words can't fully express the magic of Spoleto !!! I 've been there this week end. Unforgettable!

 

If you are planning a trip to Italy next summer, and more specifically to Umbria, you might want to consider coming when the SPOLETO FESTIVAL OF TWO WORLDS takes place in july. The 59th edition takes place from june 24 through july 10, 2016. Founded in 1957 by composer and conductor GIAN CARLO MENOTTI, this multi-faceted feast of cultural events has been copied in the U.S. Menotti's conception was the first to feature a lavish buffet of cultural happenings whose programs range from grand opera to conferences on science and economics, classical ballet to experimental theater, chamber music to daily jazz concerts in the town square, mock trials of historical figures to marionettes, artexhibits to classic and cult cinema. Over the years many young artists of diverse fields have been launched through their performances/exhibits here and gone on to become household names worldwide. Luciano Pavarotti, Jerome Robbins, Rudolph Nureyev, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Tommy Schippers, Anna Moffo, Jill Clayburgh, Al Pacino, Jacqueline du Pre, Peter Serkin, Twyla Tharp, Franco Zeffirelli are just a few of the artists, directors and conductors who have performed at Spoleto. The town of Spoleto itself, a community built on a hill beginning around the fifth or sixth century B.C. can boast some of its original protecting walls, along as a second century amphiteatre just outside the walls. It was a sleepy hill town in 1958 when Menotti organized the first festival and has since become known world-wide. A visit to Umbria could include the town of Assisi, the home of St.Francis, the hill town of Todi, visits to wineries and ceramic factories in Deruta along with meals at some of the best restaurants in Italy. The opening and closing symphonic concerts held in the enormous piazza in front of the Duomo are always sold-out events, and the experience of hearing the exquisite music performed in the fading twilight as swallows flutter around the facade and tower until the last light is unforgettable. It is said that one of the reasons that Menotti chose Spoleto for the home of his festival was because in the mid-fifties it was the only town in Italy that would agree to closing the center to automotive traffic which helped to create an atmosphere congenial to the artists, visitors and spectators. Exploring the town on foot and discovering its hidden corners is one of the pleasure of the visit.

 

Love,

T.

Lunedì, 27 Giugno 2016

BILL CUNNINGHAM.

                              RIDING MY BIKE IN HEAVEN.

 

 

                                             Love,

                                               T.

Venerdì, 24 Giugno 2016

CHRISTO. THE FLOATING PIERS.

A M A Z I N G   !!!

For sixteen days - june 18 through july 3, 2016  (weather permitting) - Italy's Lake Iseo is being reimagined - 100,000 square meters of shimmering yellow fabric, carried by a modular floating dock system of 220,000 high-density polyethylene cubes, undulate with the movement of the waves as visitors can experience this work of art by walking on it from Sulzano to Monte Isola and to the island of San Paolo which is framed by the Floating Piers. The mountains surrounding the lake offer a bird's-eye view of the Floating Piers, exposing unnoticed angles and altering perspectives. "Those who experience the Floating Piers will feel like they are walking on water or perhaps the back of a whale", says Christo. The Floating Piers was first conceived by Christo and Jeanne-Claude together in 1970. Wrapping, tying, covering. A silent obscuring of elements in the environment that temporarily deprives them of utility. A sense of time - and timing - are key aspects of Christo's art. This may be seen not only in the precise coordination of the many people that are required to execute one of his projects, but also in the sense of time as seen in its multiple states of duration. Christo's monumental projects are conceived, organized, executed and then dismantled. One may be involved with one or all of these various segments of the cycle, but in his execution of each Christo has also recognized one medium that is perhaps the epitome of the modern sensibility of time-photography. Each stage of a project is "documented" and the photographer is an integral part of the creative team. The majority of people who know about Christo's art most likely have never seen an actual piece. Rather it is through the post-execution exhibitions and publications that most of us have gained insight into his ideas and concepts. One of the most difficult issues raised by Christo's projects is the question of permanence as it relates to the work of art. That art objects of the past have traditionally been intended to last is indicated by the use of stone as one of the prime sculptural materials, by the development of oil and tempera, over centuries, to minimize cracking and peeling, and by the care with which art objects of value are preserved and protected from damage and deterioration. " I have the desire to do these works. Nobody asked me to spend millions of dollars at these sites. These works are irrational. This irrationality is linked to freedom. Freedom is linked to individualism The very basic premise that it cannot be bought, cannot be commercialized, no one can charge tickets. Everybody can go to see them. The projects will go away and nobody own them. The dynamics: to the temporariness, to the going away, to the missing. The work is in transition. The fabric is the principal element that translates that vulnerability, the passing of our life, the going away without the arrogance of wanting to be immortal. The fabric is not static. Projects are moving in the vind and water like living objects, different from the static way other artists have depicted fabrics in paintings or sculpture".

 

Love,

T.

Giovedì, 23 Giugno 2016

TIFFANY BOZIC.

TIFFANY BOZIC  has spent the majority of her life living with and observing the intricacies of nature. Her work has the traditional air of tightly rendered nature illustrations but with a highly emotional range of surreal metaphorical themes. In her paintings and sketches she presents her vision of life's struggles and triumphs that are largely autobiographical. Her wide array of subjects are inspired both from her extensive travels to wild places, and the research specimens at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, C.A.. Over the years Bozic has developed a complex process of masking and staining so the natural grain can collaborate with each composition using multiple layers of watered down acrylic paint on maple pannels of wood. She's a self-tought artist currently living and working in her cottage under the redwood trees in Marin. Tiffany Bozic explorations into nature and the animal kingdom have opened a window into the heart of the human condition. Through her abstute observations and a profound connection with the natural world; Bozic creates percipient visual metaphors with universal clarity. Her surreal and symbolic narratives trigger a myriad of searching thoughts pertaining to facets of human existence with a particular focus on our emotional bonds, survival mechanism, fears and self identity.

"A few years ago my husband and I bought a house up in Marin, CA. It is nestled in a hillside under towering redwood trees with coyotes, bobcats, spotted owls and turkeys. It is very rich in inspiration. My community here in the Bay Area is comprised mostly of friends working in very diverse fields from mine, which is enriching and interesting. I haven't necessarily come up with a uniform approach. I try to spend time outdoors whenever I can and take photos for my library to later reference. Sometimes I build sets of dioramas in my studio. The visions come to me in a myriad of ways and each present a new challenge that I have to figure out how to solve. The invisible thing that shapes everything I produce is emotion. I have always been very inspired by music ( Johnny Auduban, Ernst Haeckel, Louis Armstrong, Nina Simone, Bjork). I am very aware that as an artist I am an adsorbent creature and subconsciously I can pick up on external signals, which is why I try to keep that vulnerable part of myself private in order to protect it. Though I deeply respect scientific accuracy, it is not my primary goal. I want to capture emotion like music can. As an artist I feel a personal sense of responsibility to myself to explore a sense of awe and fascination. I am interested in the process of weaving reality and imaginary into one, the balance between the irrational and emotional. My reality is a product of my brain, my biology. I experience a lot of things that only exist in my imagination and these experiences, like love and grief are just as real to me as the chair I'm sitting in.".

 

Love,

T.

"Most of the time I work from my own photographs that I've taken on my trips. Sometimes this is just impossible though. This is my painting "Growth" featuring deep-sea organisms (detail). For a large part of the painting I referenced an elaborate bouquet of flowers I commissioned my florist friend Natasha to build for me. So once I had the structure and composition worked out I had to build the rest of the creatures over and around it. Since I do not currently own a deep-sea submersible, I had to resort to referencing royalty free photographs. This same painting was inspired by a night dive near Madang on my first trip to Papua New Guinea in 2006. I have always been deeply fearful of swimming in black water. So to face my fears I decided to take a boat out in the light of the moon. I was about 40 feet down in the pitch darkness when I came across a bioluminiscent jellyfish with rainbow strobe lights pulsating right in front of me. Metaphorically, deep-sea creatures represent my own darkest fears and desire's so I kept returning to that jellyfish in my mind over the years. I finally decided to paint it nearly a decade later to represent the inner change and growth that I've experienced as I've grown older. You never really stop feeling fear, but in time you learn to harness the fear into positive empathy and wisdom. My goal has always been the same: to grow. I still feel like I have so much to learn. I want to discover as much as I can about the world and my place in it, to push myself into the unknown."

 

Love,

T.

           OSTERIA FRANCESCANA, Modena. Italy. THE WORLD'S BEST RESTAURANT 2016.

 

Massimo Bottura's Modena destination wows the world in distinctive Italian style. Yes!!! As voted for a panel of almost 1.000 gastronomic experts worldwide. Massimo Bottura's tranquil restaurant in Modena back street rightly steps up to take the global crown, reflecting the chef's ongoing creativity, immense skill, undimmed passion and fierce determination to defy the odds. The 53-year-old chef-owner who celebrated Osteria Francescana's 20th anniversary in 2015, has long played with Italian culinary standards reinventing, subverting and improving. But in a country whose food culture is deeply conservative, that is a daring and sometimes controversial path to take. His wife, Lara, is American. Bottura's creations are heavily influenced by art and music (jazz in particular), and three elegant rooms that make up the dining space are adorned with high-quality contemporary art works. The effervescent Bottura founded FOOD FOR SOUL non-profit project in early 2016 in a bid to fight hunger and food wastage. Bottura says his passion for the kitchen began with his love for pasta; the way his grandmother rolled out translucent yellow sheets of dough for her tortellini twice a day, and how she told him the knealing, rolling and folding would strength his character. He was attracted to how "humble" and "generous" the dish could be. He deconstructed a mortadella panino - the beloved staple his mother used to put in his school bag every day whose taste he said is "fixed in my soul" - using foam, pistacchio and a gnocco on the side. Croccantino of foie gras, Oops! I dropped the lemon tart, Five ages of Parmigiano Reggiano in different textures and temperatures and Beautiful psychedelic spin-painted veal, not flame grill!!!! For the deconstructed panino, Bottura made a simmering mortadella water that he created through a distillation process, which he used to make a "creamy" version of the Italian sausage. The result is a taste that disappears on the palate immediately, but has a "long and persistent" flavour. It took him four years to get the dish right. "He is a poet of the land in which he lives and he takes the history of the country and the region and the ingredients and turns that into something that is a dish" says Dana Cowin editor of Food & magazine and Chef Club International creative director. "Each dish tells a very complete story. Everyone today wants to be a storyteller. His food and thinking are lyrical. It is like the Odyssey", she adds. "He is a poet, a visionary" states food critic Roberto Perrone.

I'm in love with Bottura's Art !!!!

 

Love,

T.

Venerdì, 17 Giugno 2016

BEES AT THE OPERA !

While bees all over the world are dying in hoards, hives are sprouting up all over Paris's rooftops, balconies, parks and gardens. Fewer pesticides and wider variety of plants and trees are helping bees colonies thrive here. Jean Paucton has kept bees on the roof of Paris's opera house for about 25 years. The retired opera house accessory artist said that the hives, which overlook the Galeries Lafayette department store in central Paris, are healthier than the ones he keeps in the country. Paucton's city hives produce 450 kilograms of honey a year. Paucton said loss in the countryside can be as much as 50 percent, while the number in the city doesn't even approach 5 percent. The success of a three-year-old French program to encourage beekeeping in cities, the largest such project in the world, is sparking hope of a revival among their country cousins. Mr.Paucton was trained as a graphic artist and spent his career as a prop man for the opera. He studied beekeeping at the city's Jardin du Luxembourg where a school has been teaching Parisians about hives and honey for 150 years. He ordered his first hive which was delivered to him sealed and full of bees at the opera house. He had intended to take it to his country house north of Paris, but when his plans changed he needed some place to store the humming box. An opera house fireman who had been raising trout in the building's huge cistern suggested he put the hives on the roof where the bees would not bother anyone. Mr. Poucton lugged the box up and out onto a seventh-floor at the back of the building and opened the hive. When he came back to pick it up two weeks later, he found it already full of honey!. "They make more honey here than they do in the countryside", Mr. Paucton says. "The bees go to the chestnut trees in the Champs Elysées and the linden trees in the Palais Royal". He says the bees occasionally cause trouble when the swarm splits and follows a new queen in search of another home. He was once called to recoup a mass of bees from the opera house's bust Charles Garnier. Thanks to the concentration of fragrant flowering trees and shrubs, his honey has an intense floral flavor . "Some peolpe say it tastes like bubble gum", he says. Bee populations are thriving at well known such as Jardin des Tuileries, Jardin du Luxembourg, as well as on the glass dome of the Grand Palais off of the Champs Elysées.

 

Love,

T.

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